The math behind radioactive carbon dating

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: summarize and describe the application software used for personal, business, and workgroup use; analyze how software controls the computing environment; outline and define the components of computer hardware, including input and output devices; summarize the history of computing, including how computers have impacted society; define and appraise the different types of database systems and data types; examine and describe the basics of Internet programming, scripting languages, search engines, and Internet protocols; summarize the networking options available to interconnect computers and systems; diagram and evaluate the life cycle of developing software, such as applications, drivers, or operating systems; and describe and define the five basic elements of programming and what programmers do.

Major topics include: application software; systems software; computer hardware; social impacts and history of computing; data communications; World Wide Web; networks access and architecture; software development; and programming methodology.

Major topics include: business ownership types; key accounting concepts; journals and ledgers in accounting; accounting equations and formulas; financial statements, balance sheets and income statements; analyzing financial statements; financial statement ratios; accounting for inventory; accounting for deprecation; accounting for compensation, taxes and liabilities; adjustments and closing entries; corporate accounting; departmentalized accounting; taxation for corporations; and business and financial forecasting.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: diagram and analyze the 4 Ps of marketing: product, place, price, and promotion; explain and evaluate marketing philosophies, including market and sales orientation; illustrate how marketers establish and analyze competitive advantage; analyze global marketing and diagram concerns about marketing in foreign markets; model consumer behavior theory and the decision-making process; differentiate between business and consumer marketing; diagram product life cycles and the process for creating new products; demonstrate comprehension of and differentiate between services and goods; differentiate between promotion, advertising, and public relations; and distinguish between relationship selling and traditional methods.Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appraise the process involved in corporate governance and how it applies to managerial accounting; evaluate the reports that make up the financial statements and how to prepare them; summarize the functions of cost classifications, cost allocation, and job order cost systems; breakdown cost-volume-profit analysis and how it relates to income statements; dissect how firms decide on a pricing strategy and the different pricing methods; summarize how companies set standard costs and why they are advantageous; point out the different methods, ratios and formulas important in financial analysis; evaluate the software programs pertinent to managerial accounting, and discover their benefits; and assess the different types of budgeting, including capital budgeting, why budgeting is important, and different methods for budgeting.Methods of instruction include audiovisual materials and case studies.offers general education courses commonly taken in the first two years of college as well as professional development and continuing education courses.Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand the purpose of accounting, generally accepted accounting principles, ethical accounting and technology in accounting; interpret balance sheets, income statements and cash flow statements, and understand how to prepare different financial statements and the auditing process; discover debits, credits, journal entries, the trial balance and how to determine a company's performance based on financial statement ratios; explain internal controls, safeguards and bank reconciliation; study accounts receivable, revenue recognition, the allowance method, notes receivable and disposing of receivables; define long-term operating assets, plant assets, the cost principle, acquisition of property, computing depreciation, natural resource assets and accounting for intangible assets; breakdown loans, equity investments, raising equity financing, corporations, stockholder's equity, common and preferred stock, accounting for stock and retained earnings; and distinguish the purpose and elements of financial statement analysis, standards for comparison, horizontal analysis, vertical analysis and financial ratio analysis.

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Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to compare and contrast the levels, roles, and functions of management; distinguish between modern theories of management, including quality management and systems management theory; break down quantitative management and the roles of branches such as operations management ; illustrate the types of planning and its function in management; model different types of organizations, including centralized and decentralized organizations; examine leadership and its role in organizations and the difference between a manager and a leader; analyze the role of motivation in the workplace and how managers affect motivation; illustrate the communication process and the role of organizational communication; analyze the decision making process and describe tools used to make informed decisions; and relate the managerial functions in international organizations and characteristics of an international manager.

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